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eNews Note 02 – May 2019

In this note:

    • An article about the Friends of Steep Church and the work they have paid for to protect the Memorial Windows in Steep Church
    • News of a Poetry event in Portsmouth in June that will feature a talk about Edward Thomas
    • An opportunity to walk in the footsteps of Edward Thomas in July
    • An update about the joint Edward Thomas Fellowship / John Clare Society Study Day in September
    • A note about the Friends of the Dymock Poets Autumn Weekend in October
    • Ben Mackay is looking for volunteers to ‘trial’ his “In Pursuit of Spring” Walks
    • A copy of the draft minutes from this year’s AGM
    • And finally a 2020 date for your diary

Welcome to the second eNewsnote, which is intended to keep members of the Fellowship up to date with forthcoming events (which will also be featured on the Fellowship’s website) and other news that may be of interest.… Continue Reading

Related Figures

Edward Thomas | Petersfield Museum

Edward Thomas is widely regarded as a major poet and his posthumous influence on English poetry has been considerable. He took much inspiration from the natural beauty of the South Downs countryside, especially around his home near Steep, Petersfield.

Friends of the Dymock Poets

Gloucestershire Poets, Writers and Artists Collection (University of Gloucestershire)

Richard Jefferies Society

Walter de la Mare Society

Arthur Ransome Society

The Frost Place
A museum and poetry centre at Robert Frost’s home in Franconia, New Hampshire, USA

AE Housman
(the Housman Society)

Wilfred Owen Association

Siegfried Sassoon Fellowship

Rupert Brooke Society

GK Chesterton
(the American Chesterton Society)

William Morris Society (UK)
Once, when asked what other writing man he would choose to have been, Edward Thomas answered “William Morris”.… Continue Reading

Related Themes

Edward Thomas: Locations of Poems
Anthony Beggs is photographing places in Hampshire associated with Edward Thomas, especially those relating to particular poems.

University of Cardiff Special Collections

National Library of Wales

Gloucestershire Heritage Hub

Alliance of Literary Societies
The Edward Thomas Fellowship is a member of the Alliance of Literary Societies. Their website contains links to the member societies’ homepages.

Royal Society of Literature

Campaign to Protect Rural England
Recognising Edward Thomas’s concerns with nature, the landscape and rural life, the Fellowship is affiliated to CPRE.

Ramblers’ Association
Walking in the countryside was one of Edward Thomas’s greatest joys.

Open Spaces Society

British Agricultural History Society

Society for Folk Life Studies

English Folk Dance and Song Society

Halsway Manor
A medieval manor house in Somerset that is a conference venue and home to the National Centre for Folk Arts.… Continue Reading

Words

Out of us all
That make rhymes,
Will you choose
Sometimes —
As the winds use
A crack in a wall
Or a drain,
Their joy or their pain
To whistle through —
Choose me,
You English words?

I know you:
You are light as dreams,
Tough as oak,
Precious as gold,
As poppies and corn,
Or an old cloak:
Sweet as our birds
To the ear,
As the burnet rose
In the heat
Of Midsummer:
Strange as the races
Of dead and unborn:
Strange and sweet
Equally,
And familiar,
To the eye,
As the dearest faces
That a man knows,
And as lost homes are:
But though older far
Than oldest yew, —
As our hills are, old, —
Worn new
Again and again:
Young as our streams
After rain:
And as dear
As the earth which you prove
That we love.… Continue Reading

Two Pewits

Under the after-sunset sky
Two pewits sport and cry,
More white than is the moon on high
Riding the dark surge silently;
More black than earth. Their cry
Is the one sound under the sky.
They alone move, now low, now high,
And merrily they cry
To the mischievous Spring sky,
Plunging earthward, tossing high,
Over the ghost who wonders why
So merrily they cry and fly,
Nor choose ‘twixt earth and sky,
While the moon’s quarter silently
Rides, and earth rests as silently.

 … Continue Reading

To-Night

Harry, you know at night
The larks in Castle Alley
Sing from the attic’s height
As if the electric light
Were the true sun above a summer valley:
Whistle, don’t knock, to-night.

I shall come early, Kate:
And we in Castle Alley
Will sit close out of sight
Alone, and ask no light
Of lamp or sun above a summer valley:
To-night I can stay late. 

 … Continue Reading

The Other

The forest ended. Glad I was
To feel the light, and hear the hum
Of bees, and smell the drying grass
And the sweet mint, because I had come
To an end of forest, and because
Here was both road and inn, the sum
Of what’s not forest. But ’twas here
They asked me if I did not pass
Yesterday this way. ‘Not you? Queer.’
‘Who then? and slept here?’ I felt fear.

I learnt his road and, ere they were
Sure I was I, left the dark wood
Behind, kestrel and woodpecker,
The inn in the sun, the happy mood
When first I tasted sunlight there.… Continue Reading

The New House

Now first, as I shut the door,
I was alone
In the new house; and the wind
Began to moan.

Old at once was the house,
And I was old;
My ears were teased with the dread
Of what was foretold,

Nights of storm, days of mist, without end;
Sad days when the sun
Shone in vain: old griefs and griefs
Not yet begun.

All was foretold me; naught
Could I foresee;
But I learned how the wind would sound
After these things should be. 

 … Continue Reading

The Manor Farm

The rock-like mud unfroze a little and rills
Ran and sparkled down each side of the road
Under the catkins wagging in the hedge.
But earth would have her sleep out, spite of the sun;
Nor did I value that thin gilding beam
More than a pretty February thing
Till I came down to the old Manor Farm,
And church and yew-tree opposite, in age
Its equals and in size. The church and yew
And farmhouse slept in a Sunday silentness.
The air raised not a straw. The steep farm roof,
With tiles duskily glowing, entertained
The mid-day sun; and up and down the roof
White pigeons nestled.… Continue Reading

The Combe

The Combe was ever dark, ancient and dark.
Its mouth is stopped with bramble, thorn, and briar;
And no one scrambles over the sliding chalk
By beech and yew and perishing juniper
Down the half precipices of its sides, with roots
And rabbit holes for steps. The sun of Winter,
The moon of Summer, and all the singing birds
Except the missel-thrush that loves juniper,
Are quite shut out. But far more ancient and dark
The Combe looks since they killed the badger there,
Dug him out and gave him to the hounds,
That most ancient Briton of English beasts.

 … Continue Reading